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Thinking about Asking for a Raise? Read These 15 Tips First!
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Thinking about Asking for a Raise? Read These 15 Tips First!

A recent CareerBuilder survey on salaries found that 66% of people (both men and women) who ask for a raise receive...

Thinking about Asking for a Raise? Read These 15 Tips First!

A recent CareerBuilder survey on salaries found that 66% of people (both men and women) who ask for a raise receive one. Those are pretty good odds. Most people, however, never even ask for more money due to shame or fear. Here are 15 ways to improve those odds and ensure you get the raise you so richly deserve.  Try to create a website with Bookmark to showcase your resume.

 

1. Wait one year: If you want a raise before you’ve been with an employer for a single year, you should have negotiated your starting salary before you accepted the job. A year is enough time to judge your own performance and for the employer to see real and consistent results.

 

2. Save the sob story: Even if your boss is a nice person, don’t expect him/her to make decisions based on your situation at home. Bosses don’t want to know about employee hardships like school fees or your struggles with bank payments. Their job is to make decisions that will benefit the business or organisation. Concentrate on what you can do for the team.

 

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3. Calculate your worth: See if you are underpaid in relation to the job market average. This way you will have evidence that does not relate to your opinions or those of your boss. It’s hard to argue with hard data. Find out if, based on your job performance, it makes business sense for you to be paid more than you currently are.

 

4. Strengthen your case: Even if you aren’t being paid less than the market average, make sure you know this and that you are not caught off guard. This way you can acknowledge this fact and concentrate on other reasons for your raise. Perhaps you have unique qualifications or more experience than most people in similar positions.

 

5. Gather evidence of your personal good work and performance: This means statistics about exactly what you have done for the benefit of your company or your department. Prove your worth by showing concrete results. Don’t compare yourself with co-workers who have received raises or those whom you have outperformed. Make it all about you.

 

6. Keep it positive: Make it a meeting about an improved future for both you and your employer. This means avoiding obvious negatives like begging or threats. Don’t even say that you need a raise (even if you do) but rather that you’re an asset and you want to help the team.

 

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7. Time your request: The best time to ask for more money is when the company is doing well, especially if you have something to do with its success. Did you just close a deal or complete an important project? Sounds like the perfect time to ask for that pay hike.

 

8. Educate yourself about your employer: What can they afford? What are their struggles,     advantages and disadvantages? Are they growing, shrinking, or stagnant? An employee who is knowledgeable about these things is a valuable asset.

 

9.Overshoot — but just a little: Come up with an amount you’d be happy with and increase it a little bit. Don’t ask for what you obviously don’t deserve, only slightly more than what would satify you. That way if you’re turned down, you have a second figure. Then everyone can leave the meeting feeling they’ve achieved something.

 

10. Alternatives to a raise: If your employer just can’t (or won’t) raise your salary, perhaps there are other perks you can get so you can still walk away from the meeting feeling better than when you came in. A bonus, more vacation time, a better office, dental insurance, or some other benefit might run a close second to a pay increase.

 

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11. Got another offer? Either be prepared to accept it or keep quiet. If you’re going to use an offer for another job as a negotiating tool, you’d better be willing to take the job. Otherwise, you’ll either end up with no raise and less respect or, worse -- no job at all.

 

12. Practice with a friend or colleague: Don’t just go in and improvise. A dry run will help     you iron out any kinks and provide an opportunity to get feedback from someone else. If you can’t or don’t want to practice with another person, at least run through the meeting a couple of times by yourself.     

 

13. No ultimatums: Ultimatums can create an adversarial relationship with your boss. They might work, but you’re risking a nasty dismissal or an awkward future.

 

14. Be prepared for “no”: Don’t hang all your hopes on this one meeting. If your boss rejects your offer, be thankful, smile, and express your understanding. Set another date (perhaps in 6 months time) for another meeting to return to the topic.     

 

15. Ask on a Tuesday: This final tip may sound silly, but studies show that people are most productive on Tuesday mornings. If you can schedule your meeting for a Tuesday, you’re more likely to find your boss in a productive and positive mood. On the same topic, avoid Monday meetings, when moods are more likely to be lower.


 

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Got any other tips for asking for a raise? Feel free to share them below in the comments section!

 

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