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The Coolest DIY projects of the Google+ Raspberry Pi Community
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The Coolest DIY projects of the Google+ Raspberry Pi Community

Since Raspberry Pi debuted in 2012, it’s been a favorite among hobbyists and tinkerers. A credit card-sized, ...

The Coolest DIY projects of the Google+ Raspberry Pi Community

Since Raspberry Pi debuted in 2012, it’s been a favorite among hobbyists and tinkerers. A credit card-sized, single-board computer, the Raspberry Pi is small enough to fit in a pocket and versatile enough to be used in almost any way a computer can be used, and more. As the price of the most expensive model never goes above $50, it’s fitting that its original purpose was to teach basic computer science in UK schools.

 

One of the most inspiring aspects of Raspberry Pi is its community. Millions of people use Raspberry Pis as platforms for their inventions, utilizing the little computers to build everything from remote-controlled cars, to motion-detecting cameras, to video game arcade cabinets. While scouring the Google + communities, we found so many inspiring and creative uses for this little gadget that we felt compelled to share them with you.

 

Take this one, for instance: hobbyist Timofei Gapakov loved the RetroPie Project so much, he decided to give it a fitting case. Just FYI, the RetroPie project is a method to turn a Raspberry Pi into a retro gaming console, and Timofei wanted to take it to the next level.

 

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More of an arts-and-crafts than a programming project, Timofei’s Pi NES is a RetroPie version of Raspbian in a regular black case, painted to look like the Nintendo Entertainment System. An NES with an HDMI port for under 50 bucks? Sign us up!

And how about this project: game afficionado Peter O’Connel took the PiPlay emulator and slapped it into a custom old-school mini arcade cabinet. We love the name “PiCade.”

 

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Of course, you can use a Pi like a regular computer. Just look at Pi tinkerer Neo Tsn: he hooked up a Pi build to a laptop shell and built his own little netbook.

 

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Even without the laptop shell, the Raspberry Pi clear case on the right looks super-snazzy.

 

Some users are concerned about their home security, so they use their Pis to set up a surveillance system. Google+ user John Nevill built a motion-sensing PiCam using a Pi, a camera and a simple wooden case.

 

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On the other hand, some people just want to make pretty things. User Fabrizio Branca had an idea for a Pi-driven robotic LED light that produced colorful images in long exposure.

 

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Doesn’t look like much, right? Wait until you see the photos it made.

 

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And then, there are the projects that are so far out there that you wonder how anyone came up with the idea in the first place. This Pi project, first built by Michael Teeuw and replicated by Marcus Martini, looks like something straight out of Star Trek.

 

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That’s a one-way mirror. Inside the mirror is a flat display device hooked up to a Raspberry Pi, showing you any kind of info you tell it to-- the weather, a clock, an inspiring message, a custom news feed, anything. The Magic Mirror is one of the coolest Pi projects out there-- I’m thinking of trying to build one myself.

 

And while we’re on the topic of sanding down wood, check out what David Art’s been up to. He’s taken a Raspberry Pi and built a wood-encased RC car around it. Not only that, but he’s also managed to hook up a Nintendo Wii remote to use as the RC car’s remote control. What’s even cooler is that he’s created a Google Doc outlining the parts and process necessary to recreate this Pi experiment in your own garage.

 

 

These are just some of the projects that have caught our eye. There’s a ton of other DIY hacks that use the Pi on the hashtag #raspberrypi on Google+. Have a look around for yourself, and don’t forget to share your favorite ones with us and on the hashtag. Happy hacking!

 

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