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Need Crowdfunding? Here Are 8 Great Kickstarter Alternatives
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Need Crowdfunding? Here Are 8 Great Kickstarter Alternatives

While Kickstarter remains the most recognisable name in crowdfunding, there are many other sites out there that off...

Need Crowdfunding? Here Are 8 Great Kickstarter Alternatives

While Kickstarter remains the most recognisable name in crowdfunding, there are many other sites out there that offer alternative models and specialised services. If you don’t want to get lost in the “crowd” of crowdfunding or would like to use a site more tailored to your individual project, you probably want to shop around for the best fit. We’ve prepared a list of some great Kickstarter alternatives to help fund your dream.

 

Most crowdsourcing sites follow one of three main platform models:

  • Keep it All (KiA) — All funds are kept by the creator (minus commission) whether or not the goal is met or the project is realised. Investors can be refunded at the creator’s discretion.

  • All or Nothing (AoN) — Funds are withheld by the crowdsourcing site until the goal is reached. If the goal is not reached, investors are refunded.

  • Bounty — Funds are awarded once a problem is solved or a service fulfilled.

 

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Indiegogo: The main challenger to Kickstarter’s dominant position, Indiegogo takes 9% of all funds raised compared to the 8-10% taken by Kickstarter (together with Amazon). A key difference is that money raised via Indiegogo immediately enters the users’ PayPal accounts. This means that funds can be collected even if the fundraising goal is not reached, though in these cases Indiegogo takes a larger cut.

 

Pozible: This Australian-based crowdfunding platform focuses on creative projects and allows payment via credit and debit cards as well as PayPal. Pozible takes 5% of funds raised by successful projects (unsuccessful projects pay no fees) and only 4% from new projects by previously successful creators. Creators must offer progressively valuable non-financial rewards to supporters, though supporters may choose not to accept them.

 

FundedByMe: Multi-lingual, but primarily in English, FundedByMe is based in Sweden, concentrating on Scandinavian crowd investment projects by artists, musicians and entrepreneurs. It has been used for mostly small projects and provides an “all or nothing” service. FundedByMe facilitates equity-, reward- and loan-based campaigns in 10 European countries, plus Singapore.

 

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Bountysource: This US-based, open-source crowdfunding project for software developers inverts Kickstarter’s model: backers come up with a problem or project, pledge money through PayPal or Bitcoin, and developers then try to solve the problem in order to earn the money. Bountysource acts as the trustee and releases the funds when users are satisfied with the provided source code.

 

FundAnything: Started by American entrepreneur Bill Zanker, FundAnything aims to bring crowdfunding to the general public and is backed by multi-billionaire Donald Trump. This broad-based platform works on the KiA (Keep it All) system.

 

Gambitious: A Dutch project for independent game developers, this crowdfunding site is run on a co-operative model in which investors receive a share of future profits.

 

Peoplefund.it: Started as the UK’s answer to Kickstarter, Peoplefund.it is centred on creative and tech projects, but encompasses a wide variety of categories. Operating on an AoN platform, it takes 5% of all funds raised plus 3% in payment processing fees.

 

 

Crowdtilt: Working on both AoN and KiA platforms, this San Francisco-based crowdfunder facilitates projects toward virtually any goal, using a “tilt point” to define the minimum amount of funding needed for the money to be released. Crowdtilt takes a 5% processing fee that is evenly split between the contributor and the campaign owner. Unlike Kickstarter, Crowdtilt also supports tax-deductible charity fundraising.

 

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