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Move Over WordPress: 10 Other Ways to Start Your Own Website
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Move Over WordPress: 10 Other Ways to Start Your Own Website

With over 10 years of strong performance, WordPress is the most popular blog publishing system on the web. It also ...

Move Over WordPress: 10 Other Ways to Start Your Own Website

With over 10 years of strong performance, WordPress is the most popular blog publishing system on the web. It also functions as the CMS (content management system) for over 20 million websites. As the top dog in the online publishing game, however, WordPress is a common target for viruses, hacks, and other attacks. Its many plugins are convenient and helpful, but also make WordPress vulnerable to security threats.

 

While the advantages of WordPress are well known, there are a host of other established and up-and-coming website platforms that can offer what you’re looking for. Whether you’re in the market for a more secure system, different looks and features, or just want to separate yourself from the pack, here’s a list of a few noteworthy WordPress alternatives.

 

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Bookmark: Bookmark.com is a website creation tool for non-technical people. Our simple, drag-and-drop technology makes creating a professional website fast, easy and fun. Bookmark offers full online e-learning courses to enhance your business or career on the internet as well as a community forum where users can ask questions. We're different because Bookmark offers a number of fully functional web page sections that are typical to most websites such as content layouts, event registration, about us, testimonials, photo gallery and more. These sections called “Focus” are further customizable. Bottom line: even a newcomer with no coding experience can create a beautiful, fully functional website in very little time.

 

Ghost: A free and simple publishing platform that charges for the use of its server, Ghost is for bloggers who don’t need all the bells and whistles. It’s a blogging-centred CMS that offers a real WP alternative for those who just want to write and publish.

 

Jekyll: On the other side of the spectrum, Jekyll is a place where those familiar with code can turn their “plain text into static websites and blogs.” If you don’t know what that means, then Jekyll might not be for you, but if you like dealing with code and you’re looking for free and fast publishing, give Jekyll a try.

 

Wix: A real challenger to WordPress, Wix is a non-open source platform with in-house plugins and automatic updates. More basic and easier to use, Wix’s fewer options mean fewer bugs, but don’t expect results that compare to a professional WordPress site. Hard work and money still win every time.

 

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SquareSpace: Great-looking straight off the bat, breakaway CMS SquareSpace is a successful paid publishing platform with three monthly price categories ($10, $20, and $30). Known as the “Apple” CMS, Squarespace’s aesthetic and usability may be preferable to the greater control and choice offered by WordPress.

 

Drupal: An open source CMS giant, Drupal is used for anything from personal blogs to United States government sites including the official White House homepage. Drupal has been continually developed since its release in 2001 and is a powerful and flexible platform. It’s not as pretty as the competition, though, and it has usability issues that make it difficult for beginners.

 

Statamic: In its own words, Statamic (a self-contradictory portmanteau of static and dynamic) is “an entirely new kind of CMS” that runs on a simple, flat file database. It’s an option worth considering for those who don’t want to use code and are looking for an intuitive, easy-to-use publishing platform.

 

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Joomla: One of the three top CMS’s along with WordPress and Drupal, Joomla is open source and written in PHP. While it lacks SEO capability and may not be the most intuitive or user- friendly of systems, it is flexible and has a large community of developers behind it.

 

Craft: A “simple” CMS with great design, Craft offers free basic service with more functionality available at a cost. The idea with Craft seems to be to provide flexibility and options without being bloated by too many features.

 

Plone: An open source CMS that can be used to create all kinds of websites, Plone is a flexible and secure system with high usability. It is comparable to Drupal or Joomla, but is built with the Python programming language.

 

Perch: This CMS is built for web designers and can be added to a site at any time with add-ons for blogs and other features. Designers can build with Perch in order to supply highly usable sites to their non-technically-inclined clients.

 

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