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Right to be Forgotten Rules out Over 250,000 Links
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Right to be Forgotten Rules out Over 250,000 Links

The recent “Right to be Forgotten” ruling by the European Union Court is living up to the hype. Google ...

Right to be Forgotten Rules out Over 250,000 Links

The recent “Right to be Forgotten” ruling by the European Union Court is living up to the hype. Google has received over 70,000 requests to erase more than 250,000 links to information from the search engine's European site branches, notes The Telegraph. On May 28, the first day the service was available, 12,000 requests were received. The number of requests per day has now fallen to about 1000, with each request asking that an average of 3.8 links be removed. The total number of links in question so far exceeds a quarter of million.

 

The European Court has ruled that Google has to get rid of “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant” information. Germany is leading in removal requests so far, having submitted over 12,000, followed by France. The UK is in third place with with more than 8,400 requests. What must be removed is Google’s links to pictures or articles, but not the information itself.

 

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So far, Google has removed The Telegraph's links to four articles and four images, two of which have referred to a 2010 Scottish football referee Dougie McDonald, and one to a former Law Society chief Robert Sayer. Other links associated with these two people have also been removed from the Telegraph's website. Links to content from the Independent related to Robert Sayer and links to Mail Online regarding Dougie McDonald have also been taken down, reports The Telegraph.  

 

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