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Controversial Ruling Grants NSA the Right to Spy on 193 Countries
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Controversial Ruling Grants NSA the Right to Spy on 193 Countries

Apparently, if you're a foreigner, the National Security Agency has the right to invade your privacy. The Washingto...

Controversial Ruling Grants NSA the Right to Spy on 193 Countries

Apparently, if you're a foreigner, the National Security Agency has the right to invade your privacy. The Washington Post reports that the U.S court has given the NSA access to all but four foreign governments, certain entities, and even emails and phone calls that are of interest to the States, according to a certification issued by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court in 2010.

 

This certification allows the NSA to look at U.S companies' communications with overseas targets, but also any communications about their targets. The four countries that are not included in the agreement – Australia, New Zealand, the UK, and Canada – already have no-spying agreements in effect.


 

Apart from collecting information on foreign countries, the NSA also has the right to collect info on institutions, like the International Monetary Fund, the European Union, and the International Atomic Energy Agency.


 

The 2010 certification was just one of many leaked documents that NSA's former contractor Edward Snowden brought to public attention, and no one was very surprised to hear the news.

 

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The most disturbing aspect of the NSA's surveillance practice is their right to collect emails and phone calls of foreigners, under Section 702 of the 2008 FISA. According to this act, the court has the right to target and protect the privacy of the Americans, which means that individuals and entities can be targeted, although the initial surveillance programme escalated from being designed to fight terrorism.


 

But that wouldn’t actually happen, would it? Why would anyone want to read my emails?


 

That was the first question that popped into my head. Who would want to read MY emails and listen to MY phone calls, and why? If you're a foreigner, and you “possess, are expected to receive and/or are likely to communicate foreign intelligence information concerning these foreign powers,” you're likely to be targeted. Even if you're a journalist, human rights researcher, or an academic, it seems the NSA has the right to monitor your communications if it comes across a name or any contact info that is on their list.

 

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But, let's keep our cool, yeah? The NSA will not be actually collecting information from all those listed countries, it only has the authority to do so. Some former government officials wanted all countries to be listed in those documents, so that in the emergency of a humanitarian crisis, Americans could be evacuated.

 

Until then, smile for the NSA, and give them sensitive information, because they are, indeed, here to secure the privacy of those whom the US Constitution protects.

 

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